My first paracord bracelets and belt

Posted: December 3, 2011 in Equipment, Paracord
Tags: , , ,

Zipper and Cobra weave bracelets

Back in the mid-1970’s I learned macrame and made A LOT of plant hangers and necklaces.  When I saw paracord bracelets and belts, I thought, “I can do that!”  Thank goodness for YouTube. Actually, making paracord stuff is easier than most macrame.

I used this video to learn how to make a cobra-weave bracelet.

An easy one to start with is the zipper weave.  One of my favorite video channels about tying a wide variety of knots is Tying it All Together.

Some variations I made

The bracelets in the pictures have 3/8″ clasps.  I have also bought some 5/8″ to make thicker bracelets for the guys.  The price for clasps varies depending on how many you buy, but are around 50 cents each.  I buy mine from Creative Designworks.

The only paracord I had on hand is OD green, so the bracelets and belts are all the same color.  I have ordered some additional colors to make a wider variety.  My source for paracord is Survival-Pax.  They are cheaper than places like Amazon and Cabela’s.

Paracord Belt

When I made a bracelet and offered to make one for my husband, he said he would rather have a belt. Oh, great.  He said it couldn’t be any wider than about an inch to fit into his belt loops.  So I ordered a 1″ belt buckle and made him a belt using a weave called wide Solomon bar.

Belt front and back sides

Belt in hiking pants

It turned out that the buckle was wide enough to accommodate the width of the weave, but it was difficult the put the end of the belt through the buckle and pull it through to fasten it.  We used a flame to melt and harden the tip making it easier to push through the belt.  After wearing it a couple of days, my husband likes it and says it works fine.  However, I have ordered a couple of belt buckles a little wider, 1 1/2″ that should be wide enough to use easily.

My conclusion is that bracelets are easy and fast to make.  I look forward to trying some different knots.  Using the Cobra weave, use about 1 foot of cord for every 1 inch of bracelet length.

The belt took longer than I anticipated, at least 6-8 hours.  I expect the second one to go faster. To make a 46″ long belt (total length), I used 3 pieces of cord.  The center cord was 40′ folded in half evenly.  The two end pieces were shorter because one piece of each is not used to tie knots, just as a base to tie around.  The total length of the 2 end cords were about 24 1/2 ft.  The outside length was 20′, and the inside portion of each folded cord was about 50″.

Belt experiment

I learned to make the cords different lengths by using relatively short pieces of cord and practicing on a buckle.  That was well worth the time.  I figured out how much cord I needed to tie the knots per inch and that 2 of the cords stayed the same length.

The hardest part is ending the belt and tying the ends off without making the end too thick.  This is something I will continue to practice on.  Just remember that whenever you cut paracord to immediately melt the ends using a lighter.  Otherwise, the outer sheath shrinks back from the inner cords.

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Comments
  1. Yerby Ray says:

    I would love to learn how to do this and make rifle shoulder straps that can be used for cord in emergency situation

    • Vina8 says:

      Yerby Ray, there are YouTube videos on how to make a rifle strap. You can use the same knots (weaves) as you use for a belt. I plan on making one for a friend of mine.

  2. We are looking forward to making bracelets with the kids in our group. Thanks for another great post! http://www.zombieapocalypsesurvivalists.com

  3. [...] My first paracord bracelets and belt « nc preppers [...]

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